December 26

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Ways to Learn

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There are so many different ways to learn. We all experience the world uniquely, which can vary in how we learn best. Understanding these different learning styles can drastically impact how instructors handle students, set up group projects, and adapt individual learning. Without understanding and acknowledging these different ways of learning, instructors might end up with a handful of students lagging behind their peers. This lag could partly be because their unique learning style hasn’t been fully encouraged, where they can learn the fastest. Recognition of these different ways to learn can also help you when you’re trying to learn something new like how to implement the lessons from the Master Key Experience.

Part of our responsibility as instructors, and as guides in the Master Key Experience, is to adjust our lessons to the unique group of students we work with at any given time. The best instructors can cater to each student’s strengths, ensuring they are truly grasping the information.

So how do you meet the needs of different learners? I have outlined the four types of learning styles and how instructors and guides can practically apply this information in their teaching space. And you can use it to adjust your own approaches in learning and absorbing new material.

1.  Visual learners

How to recognize a visual learner:  Anyone with a preference for visual learning is partial to seeing and observing things, including pictures, diagrams, written directions, and more. This type of learning is also referred to as the “spatial” learning style. Students who learn through sight understand information better when presented visually. These are your doodling students, list makers, and students who take notes. If you “see” yourself in this learning style, this might be one of your primary ways to learn. Visual learners may also need more time to process material by observing the visual cues.

2. Auditory learners

How to recognize auditory learners: Auditory learners tend to learn better when the subject matter is reinforced by sound. These students would much rather listen to a lecture than reading written notes and often use their voices to reinforce new concepts and ideas. These types of learners prefer reading out loud to themselves.

They aren’t afraid to speak up in class and are great at verbally explaining things. Additionally, they may be slower at reading and often repeat things.

We all experience the world uniquely, which can vary in how we learn best. Understanding these different learning styles can drastically impact how instructors handle students, set up group projects, and adapt individual learning. Without understanding and acknowledging these different ways of learning, instructors might end up with a handful of students lagging behind their peers.

3. Kinesthetic learners

How to recognize kinesthetic learners: Kinesthetic learners learn through touching, experiencing, or doing things. They are sometimes called tactile learners. They like to get involved by acting out events or using their hands to touch and handle them to understand concepts. These types of learners might struggle to sit still and often excel at sports or like to dance. They may need to take more frequent breaks when studying.

Once kinesthetic learners can physically sense what they’re learning, abstract ideas and challenging concepts become easier to understand.

4. Reading/writing learners

How to recognize reading/writing learners:  According to the VARK Modalities theory developed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, reading/writing learners prefer to learn through written words. Although there is some overlap with visual learning, these learners are more drawn to additional explanations.

This may include writing essays, reading articles or books, and writing in diaries. Looking up words in the dictionary and searching the internet for just about everything can become a passion. Of these four learning styles, this model is probably the easiest to cater to because these students absorb information through the written word and give them opportunities to get their ideas on paper.

As a guide for the Master Key Experience, we see how the creators of the course have used this as one of the ways of learning to make sure all students get the best they can from the course.

Embrace all types of learning

Understanding these different learning styles is essential with conducting zoom calls. Pinpointing how a person learns best can dramatically affect their ability to connect with the topics we’re teaching and how they participate with their peers. Master Key Experience (MKE) instructors incorporate all these learning behaviors. By equipping students with these tools, the instructors can empower them for life. And you can empower yourself for a great life by joining us for the next class of the Master Key Experience. Click here to find out more!

Read more articles by Wes Bartell

About the author

Wes Bartell has enjoyed life as a Naval Aviator, a career as a Software Engineer, and retired to become an entrepreneur. As an entrepreneur, it soon became complicated as to what his new role in life would be. Wes enrolled in the MKE course in 2019, and learned how to redefine his life and goals. Wes resides in Coarsegold, California, and is an avid Affiliate Marketing representative who enjoys helping other people be entrepreneurs. Wes became a Certified Guide for the MKE so that he can “pay it forward,” helping others to manifest their health and wealth.

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  • This is a fabulous explanation of the learning styles. I did not know about the reading/writing style, thinking it was part of visual learning. Now I can understand the difference. Thank you!

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